The Guide to Personal Hygiene is very Good for our bodies

Personal Hygiene: Healthy Habits Include Good Grooming

If you want to minimize your risk of infection and also enhance your overall health, follow these basic personal hygiene habits:

  • Bathe regularly. Wash your body and your hair often. “I’m not saying that you need to shower or bathe every day,” remarks Dr. Novey. “But you should clean your body and shampoo your hair at regular intervals that work for you.” Your body is constantly shedding skin. Novey explains, “That skin needs to come off. Otherwise, it will cake up and can cause illnesses.”
  • Trim your nails. Keeping your finger and toenails trimmed and in good shape will prevent problems such as hang nails and infected nail beds. Feet that are clean and dry are less likely to contract athlete’s foot, Novey says.
  • Brush and floss. Ideally, you should brush your teeth after every meal. At the very least, brush your teeth twice a day and floss daily. Brushing minimizes the accumulation of bacteria in your mouth, which can cause tooth decay and gum disease, Novey says. Flossing, too, helps maintain strong,

Drinking Alcohol Can Improve Your Health or Damage Your Health?

A large number of studies have shown that moderate alcohol intake can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease in men and women. Moderate drinking means one drink per day for women and one to two for men, says Donald Novey, MD, an integrative medicine physician with the Advocate Medical Group in Park Ridge, Ill. “The difference in amounts is because of how men and women metabolize alcohol,” Dr. Novey explains.

“When you say one drink, the size of that drink matters,” Novey adds. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture one drink is equal to:

  • 12 ounces of beer or
  • 5 ounces of wine or
  • 1½ ounces of spirits (hard liquor such as gin or whiskey, 80-proof)

The Dangers of Drinking Too Much

Unfortunately, some people can’t stop at just one or two drinks. Too much alcohol can result in serious health consequences. Heavy alcohol intake can damage the liver, causing cirrhosis, a fatal disease. Excessive drinking also can raise blood pressure and damage the heart, and is linked to many different cancers, including mouth, esophagus, breast, prostate, and colorectal

7 Ways to Make Better Water Flavor

1. Add fresh fruit. Citrus fruits, such as lemons, limes, and oranges, are classic water enhancers, but other fruit flavors might also tempt your taste buds. Try crushing fresh raspberries or watermelon into your water, or adding strawberry slices. Cucumber and fresh mint are refreshing flavors as well — especially in summer.

2. Use juice. Any fruit juice can be a good base flavor for water, but tart juices, like cranberry, pomegranate, grape, and apple, are especially delicious. Go for juices that are all natural, with no added sugars. And remember: Fruits and their juices don’t just taste good — they contain vitamins and antioxidants that can benefit your health too.

3. Make it bubbly. Many people prefer sparkling to still water. If plain old water isn’t inspiring to you, try a naturally effervescent mineral water — which will give you the added benefit of minerals. Or try bubbly seltzer, a carbonated water. You can add fresh fruit or natural juice flavors to your seltzer, as suggested above, or look for naturally flavored seltzers at your local market. If you become a seltzer devotee, you might want

5 Good Ways to Improve Women’s Health

Health Tip #1: Eat a healthy diet. “You want to eat as close to a natural foods diet as you can,” says Donald Novey, MD, an integrative medicine physician with the Advocate Medical Group in Park Ridge, Ill. That means a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables and fewer processed foods. Eat whole grains and high-fiber foods and choose leaner cuts of meat, fish, and poultry. Include low-fat dairy products in your diet as well — depending on your age, you need between 800 and 1,500 milligrams of calcium daily to help avoid osteoporosis, Dr. Novey says. Avoid foods and beverages that are high in calories, sugar, salt, and fat.

Healthy eating will help you maintain a proper weight for your height, which is important because being overweight can lead to a number of illnesses. Looking for a healthy snack? Try some raw vegetables, such as celery, carrots, broccoli, cucumbers, or zucchini with dip made from low-fat yogurt.

If you’re not getting enough vitamins and nutrients in your diet, you might want to take a multivitamin and a calcium supplement to make sure you’re maintaining good health.

Health Tip #2: Exercise. Heart disease is the leading

Multivitamins, are you obliged to Drink it?

Vitamin supplements can be particularly important during certain stages of our lives, Dr. Novey says. For example, women in their childbearing years can benefit from folic acid, which decreases the risk of some birth defects. A pregnant woman needs a multivitamin, starting in the first trimester, to ensure that the baby receives proper nutrition. Active and older women can benefit from increased calcium, which can help prevent bone loss and fractures. Vegetarians also can benefit from taking extra calcium, iron, zinc, and vitamins B12 and D.

Does it matter what time of day you take a multivitamin? Not really, says Stephen Bickston, MD, AGAF, professor of internal medicine and director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Virginia Commonwealth University Health Center in Richmond. However, he says, some people find it helpful to take vitamins at the same time every day. If it becomes part of their routine, they are less likely to forget. Also, he says, some people feel that if they take their vitamin with food, it is less likely to cause stomach upset. “I often recommend that people take a chewable vitamin,” Dr. Bickston says, “because they seem to be well tolerated, even in

How to Eat, to be Healthy Diet

The best source of meal planning for most Americans is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food Pyramid. The pyramid, updated in 2005, suggests that for a healthy diet each day you should eat:

  • 6 to 8 servings of grains. These include bread, cereal, rice, and pasta, and at least 3 servings should be from whole grains. A serving of bread is one slice while a serving of cereal is 1/2 (cooked) to 1 cup (ready-to-eat). A serving of rice or pasta is 1/2 cup cooked (1 ounce dry). Save fat-laden baked goods such as croissants, muffins, and donuts for an occasional treat.
  • 2 to 4 servings of fruits and 4 to 6 servings of vegetables. Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat, making them a great addition to your healthy diet. Fruits and vegetables also provide the fiber, vitamins, and minerals you need for your body’s systems to function at peak performance. Fruits and vegetables also will add flavor to a healthy diet. It’s best to serve them fresh, steamed, or cut up in salads. Be sure to skip the calorie-laden toppings, butter, and mayonnaise, except on

How They Save Their Lives

Seat Belt Safety: 5-Way Protection

“Seat belts prevent occupants of the vehicle from serious injury in five ways,” says Angela Osterhuber, director of the Pennsylvania Traffic Injury Prevention Project in Media, Pa. A seat belt:

  • Keeps the occupants of the vehicle inside. “It’s clearly a myth that people are better off being thrown clear from the crash,” Osterhuber says. “People thrown from a vehicle are four times more likely to be killed than those who remain inside.”
  • Restrains the strongest parts of the body. “Restraints are designed to contact your body at its strongest parts. For an older child and adult, these parts are the hips and shoulders, which is where the seat belt should be strapped,” Osterhuber says.
  • Spreads out any force from the collision. “Lap-and-shoulder belts spread the force of the crash over a wide area of the body. By putting less stress on any one area, they can help you avoid serious injury,” Osterhuber says. A shoulder strap also helps keep your head and upper body away from the dashboard, steering wheel, and other hard interior parts of the automobile should you stop suddenly or be hit by another vehicle.
  • Helps the body to slow down.

10 Ways to Fit In Exercise

The benefits of regular exercise are unrivaled: Physical activity can help you lose weight and prevent a host of ailments, including heart disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Being fit also can help you stay mentally sharp.

While most people know they should exercise, you may not know where to start or how to fit it into a busy schedule. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that healthy adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity spread out over five days a week, or 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity on each of three days a week.

“This is something we recommend to all Americans,” says Gerald Fletcher, MD, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and a spokesman for the AHA.

An ideal fitness routine also includes resistance or weight training to improve muscle strength and endurance. The ACSM and the AHA recommend that most adults engage in resistance training at least twice a week.

Finding Fitness: 10 Ways to Get in Exercise

Sometimes the problem isn’t motivation — it’s simply finding the time. But scheduling exercise isn’t as difficult as you

Benefits of water for the health of our body

Did you know that your body weight is approximately 60 percent water? Your body uses water in all its cells, organs, and tissues to help regulate its temperature and maintain other bodily functions. Because your body loses water through breathing, sweating, and digestion, it’s important to rehydrate by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. The amount of water you need depends on a variety of factors, including the climate you live in, how physically active you are, and whether you’re experiencing an illness or have any other health problems.

Water Protects Your Tissues, Spinal Cord, and Joints

Water does more than just quench your thirst and regulate your body’s temperature; it also keeps the tissues in your body moist. You know how it feels when your eyes, nose, or mouth gets dry? Keeping your body hydrated helps it retain optimum levels of moisture in these sensitive areas, as well as in the blood, bones, and the brain. In addition, water helps protect the spinal cord, and it acts as a lubricant and cushion for your joints.

Water Helps Your Body Remove Waste

Adequate water intake enables your body to excrete waste through

How Norovirus Ordinary Enter the Restaurant Food?

The “stomach bug” norovirus is behind the latest outbreak of foodborne illness linked to Chipotle, according to health officials.

This week, a Chipotle restaurant in Sterling, Virginia, temporarily closed down after multiple customers reported falling ill with vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pains after eating there. A spokesman said the restaurant chain suspected that norovirus was to blame because the symptoms of the sick customers were typical of people infected with this virus,according to Reuters. But it wasn’t until today (July 20) that health officials confirmed the cause of the illnesses after a customer tested positive for norovirus.

In total, more than 130 people reported becoming sick after eating at the Sterling restaurant, according to Business Insider. The illnesses were reported on iwaspoisoned.com, a crowdsourced website where people can report suspected food poisoning.

Norovirus is the most common cause of illnesses from contaminated food in the United States; an estimated 20 million Americans fall ill from the virus each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It’s uncertain how norovirus got into the food at this particular Chipotle restaurant. But norovirus outbreaks at restaurants usually happen when a food service worker is

1 of 3 Cases of Dementia Can Be Prevented with a Lifestyle of Healthier and Cleaner Life

One-third of dementia cases could be prevented if more people could be helped to behave in ways that would improve their brain health, according to a new report.

Some public health strategies aimed at helping people to be healthy — for example, by staying in school past age 15, protecting their hearing in midlife and keeping up with exercise and hobbies in old age — could help to decrease the global numbers of dementia cases, the researchers said in their report, published today (July 19) in the journal The Lancet.

“Society must engage in ways to reduce dementia risk throughout life, and improve the care and treatment for those with the disease,” study co-author Dr. Lon Schneider, a professor of psychiatry, neurology and gerontology at the University of Southern California, said in a statement. “This includes providing safe and effective social and health-care interventions in order to integrate people with dementia within their communities. Hopefully this will also ensure that people with dementia, their families and caregivers, encounter a society that accepts and supports them.” [6 Big Mysteries of Alzheimer’s Disease]

In the study, the researchers looked at previous research that has examined risk factors

The Science of Cooking Oils: Which Are Really the Healthiest?

These days, the shelf of the cooking-oil section of the supermarket is a crowded spot. This abundance of oil options can cause confusion about which oils may be the healthiest ones to use.

Over the past 10 years, the landscape of cooking oils has changed, said Jo Ann Carson, a professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. She pointed to the increased availability of high-oleic oils, the fairly recent arrival of coconut oil, and the wider availability of lesser-known oils such as grapeseed oil.

With so many cooking oils out there, it can be difficult to make sense of the latest health headlines about dietary fat in general, Carson said. [Special Report: The Science of Weight Loss]

Many consumers are confused about which types of dietary fat experts encourage or discourage in order to promote heart health, said Alice Lichtenstein, a professor of nutrition science and policy and director of the cardiovascular nutrition laboratory at the Tufts University Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston. Further complicating matters, there’s been hype about coconut oil, and claims have circulated that “butter is back,” Lichtenstein said.

Lichtenstein was

Do not Believe Spin Swimmers Fidget Has No Benefits at all

Fidget spinners may be fun toys, but there is no science behind claims that they help kids with attention and focus, according to a new review article.

The review, which was published July 7 in the journal Current Opinion in Pediatrics, found that no research had specifically focused on the impact of these hot new toys on thinking, attention or recall. Furthermore, there are zero peer-reviwed studies on any aspect of fidget spinners, the researchers found. Without that research, claims made by manufacturers about such links are baseless.

“There’s no science behind the idea that they increase attention,” said study co-author Dr. Ruth Milanaik, director of the neonatal follow-up program at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York. “We have to view it as what it is: It’s a toy, a fun toy.” [How Fidget Spinners Work: It’s All About the Physics]

Some of the companies marketing fidget spinners, or small, ball-bearing-filled plastic toys that spin when you rotate them, claim the toys can increase attention for those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or calm symptoms of autism or anxiety. For instance, the claims the toys are great for

Can Oxygen Therapy Really Reverse Damage to a Child’s Brain?

Two doctors claim to have used controversial oxygen treatments to reverse brain damage in a 2-year-old from Arkansas who nearly died by drowning in a cold swimming pool, but other experts are very skeptical of the claims the doctors made in their report of the case.

“I found the publication to be sufficiently suspect,” said Dr. Ian Miller, a pediatric neurologist and medical director of the comprehensive epilepsy program at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital in Miami, who was not involved in the report. “I really worry that other people who read about this on the internet will think that this is a legitimate type of therapy” for people with brain damage, when there is no proof of this, Miller told Live Science.

In the new report, the authors describe the case of 2-year-old Eden Carlson, who fell into her family’s swimming pool last year and was submerged in 41-degree-Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) water, for about 15 minutes. In total, she spent 2 hours without a heartbeat, and was not expected to survive, her family said in a YouTube video. Doctors were able to revive her, but she had experienced brain damage. After a month in the hospital,

How Brain’s ‘Helper Cells’ Could Contribute to Schizophrenia

Problems with the brain’s “helper cells” may contribute to schizophrenia, a new study in mice suggests.

The study focused on glial cells, which provide support for the neurons that do the “signaling” within the brain. For instance, glial cells help organize the connections among neurons and produce myelin, which acts as insulation around the brain’s nerve fibers.

To see if glial cells contribute to schizophrenia, the researchers first took samples of skin cells from people who developed schizophrenia in childhood, before age 13.

Then, the scientists used a technique to reprogram these skin cells to make them into cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which have the potential to become any cell type in the body. The researchers then manipulated the iPSCs so they turned into glial progenitor cells, or the cells in the body that give rise to glial cells. [10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Brain]

The researchers transplanted the glial progenitor cells into the brains of young mice. This resulted in “chimeric” mice, meaning they had regular mouse neurons but human glial progenitor cells.

The study showed that the glial cells from the people with schizophrenia were highly

How Bacteria Gut Can Make Bad Effects Bad Can Change Their Evil Ways

Could the idea that there are “good” and “bad” bacteria be a false dichotomy? A study appearing today (July 21) in the journal Science Immunology suggests so.

In a study on mice, scientists found that a group of bacteria calledHelicobacter, long associated with ulcers, stomach cancer and intestinal distress, turned “bad” only when placed in a bad gut environment.

These bacteria triggered two very different kinds of immune-system responses, depending on the health of the mice. In healthy mice raised in a nearly germ-free, controlled environment, the Helicobacter induced an immune response associated with tolerance, as if the body were saying it accepted the new bacteria along with its existing gut bacteria, collectively known as the gut microbiome. [Body Bugs: 5 Surprising Facts About Your Microbiome]

However, in mice bred to have colitis, a condition that involves inflammation of the bowel, the Helicobacter made the inflammation worse. The immune systems treated the bacteria as foreign invaders.

The study suggests that Helicobacter and similar bacteria labeled as “bad” may, in fact, be neutral or even beneficial, depending on the health of the individual. A person’s level of stress, poor diet or genetics all may influence

How Sugar Drink Can Make Your Body Stretch Burn Fat

Washing down your bacon cheeseburger with a big, cold soda may trigger the body to store more fat than it would if you drank something without sugar, a new small study finds.

When the people in the study added a sugary drink to a protein-rich meal, their bodies’ fat-burning ability decreased by 8 percent on average, the researchers found. In addition, the sugary drinks also appeared to increase their food cravings after the meal.

“We were surprised by the impact that the sugar-sweetened drinks had on metabolism when they were paired with higher-protein meals,” lead study author Shanon Casperson, a research biologist at the U.S.  Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, said in a statement. [11 Ways Processed Food is Different from Real Food]

“This combination also increased study subjects’ desire to eat savory and salty foods for four hours after eating,” Casperson added.

Indeed, earlier research has shown that people who increase their protein intake experience changes  both in how food is processed by their body and in how much they eat, according to the study, published July 20 in the journal BMC Nutrition. For example, research suggests that a higher protein intake

Be careful with the Birth Control App, Expert Say

A new smartphone app has been approved for people to use as a type of contraception in the European Union, but experts warn that you shouldn’t toss out the condoms and birth control pills just yet.

The app, Natural Cycles, is available in the Apple App Store and the Google Play store to users everywhere. It digitizes an age-old method of preventing pregnancy, sometimes called the rhythm method, natural family planning or fertility awareness. The idea is to track ovulation and avoid sex (or use additional protection) on days when a woman is most likely to be fertile. But these methods have a failure rate of about 25 percent, even though the promotional materials for Natural Cycles claim that the app is 93 percent effective. [Wonder Woman: 10 Interesting Facts About the Female Body]

“Don’t rely on something like this,” said Dr. Mary Jane Minkin, a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the Yale School of Medicine who is not involved with the company that makes the app. The app could be an option if a couple wanted to postpone pregnancy for a while but would not mind it if they did become pregnant,

Why Hunger Can Eliminate If You Ignore It Long?

Why is it that when you’re tremendously hungry, you’re able to forget about it if you’re in the middle of an intriguing activity, such as reading a good book?

It’s almost as if you’re able to ignore those hunger pangs until your task is complete, at which point the hunger can hit you hard.

Such a question might seem straightforward, but the answer is actually quite complex and perplexing, dietitians told Live Science. [Why Do Your Teeth Feel Weird After Eating Spinach?]

When a person is hungry, a cascade of triggers notifies the brain that the body needs food. One of those triggers is a hormone called ghrelin — “the only mammalian substance that has been shown to increase appetite and food intake when delivered to humans,” according to a 2006 review in the journal Physiology and Behavior.

Most of the body’s supply of ghrelin is created in the stomach and duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Once made, ghrelin can cross the blood-brain barrier and target certain parts of the brain, stimulating hunger, according to the review.

Moreover, ghrelin is with us 24/7: its levels drop as we eat, and